Library Closure

The Library will be CLOSED this morning from 8:30am to 10:30am while we host the Waterloo Math Contest.

Good luck to all of the students who are writing…

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Black History Month: Spotlight

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Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, and more. Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can’t afford health insurance.

Soon to be made into an HBO movie by Oprah Winfrey and Alan Ball, this New York Times bestseller takes readers on an extraordinary journey, from the “colored” ward of Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s to stark white laboratories with freezers filled with HeLa cells, from Henrietta’s small, dying hometown of Clover, Virginia, to East Baltimore today, where her children and grandchildren live and struggle with the legacy of her cells. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew. It’s a story inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we’re made of.

Winner of several awards, including the 2010 Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize for Nonfiction, the 2010 Wellcome Trust Book Prize, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Award for Excellence in Science Writing, the 2011 Audie Award for Best Non-Fiction Audiobook, and a Medical Journalists’ Association Open Book Award, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks was featured on over 60 critics’ best of the year lists. For more reviews, praise, and media coverage of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, please visit the book’s press page. Also explore the resources found throughout this site for book groups, classrooms, and more. (From the author’s website).

Read the review at The New York Times.

Watch the book trailer.

Catch a sneak peak at the trailer for the HBO film which airs Saturday April 22nd @ 8pm.

  • Purchase your own copy, or check out the ESA Library copy out on the Black History Month display on the upper level of the Library.

White Pine Spotlight: Rodent by Lisa J. Lawrence

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  • Complex novel addressing complex issues.
  • Poverty, addiction, and generational cycles of abuse are addressed.
  • Isabelle must deal with being bullied at school, while trying to keep her family together.. having to mother her mother, in addition to her two younger siblings.
  • Sympathetic character portrayals abound, drawing the reader into the harsh reality of Isabelle’s world.
  • Despite her reluctance to let outsiders in, Isabelle develops a support network and the reader is reminded that it takes a village.

Read the review at CM Magazine.

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  • Check out Forest Fridays, virtual visits with featured authors.  We will be hosting a couple of them here at ESA.
  • Students who would like to join us at the Festival of Trees, at Harbourfront, on Tuesday May 16th should see Ms. Wray in the Library.
  • Permission forms will be available closer to the date.

Final Friday Fun Day… on Wednesday!

Due to scheduling conflicts Final Friday Fun Day is happening today…  Wednesday..  and we’re delighted to announce the return of…

Buddha Bowls!

  • Join us for lunch in the Library.
  • For only $5 per person get your fill of a delicious healthy lunch.

Reminder that the Library will be Tech Free for the lunchhour…

  • Room 217 will be open for any students needing computer access for school related purposes.

 

White Pine Spotlight: Worlds of Ink and Shadow by Lena Coakley

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Worlds of Ink and Shadow by Lena Coakley

  • Delightful, fantastical story within a story.
  • The Bronte children – Charlotte, Branwell, Emily and Anne – embedded within their own stories.
  • Beautifully blends the real and the unreal.
  • Based on their own juvenalia, we witness the development of many of our favourite Bronte characters and settings.

Read the review at Quill and Quire.

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  • Check out Forest Fridays, virtual visits with featured authors.  We will be hosting a couple of them here at ESA.
  • Students who would like to join us at the Festival of Trees, at Harbourfront, on Tuesday May 16th should see Ms. Wray in the Library.
  • Permission forms will be available closer to the date.

Black History Month: Spotlight

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The rich and privileged have fled the city, barricaded it behind roadblocks, and left it to crumble. The inner city has had to rediscover old ways-farming, barter, herb lore. But now the monied need a harvest of bodies, and so they prey upon the helpless of the streets. With nowhere to turn, a young woman must open herself to ancient truths, eternal powers, and the tragic mystery surrounding her mother and grandmother.  She must bargain with gods, and give birth to new legends.
(From GoodReads)

 

Read the review at Quill and Quire.

  • Purchase your own copy, or check out the ESA Library copy out on the Black History Month display on the upper level of the Library.

Black History Month: Spotlight

screen-shot-2017-02-17-at-5-54-35-am2016 OCM Bocas Prize for Caribbean Literature — Longlisted
2016 RBC Taylor Prize — Longlisted

The unforgettable memoir of Giller Prize–winning author and poet Austin Clarke, called “Canada’s first multicultural writer.”

Austin Clarke is a distinguished and celebrated novelist and short-story writer. His works often centre around the immigrant experience, of which he writes with humour and compassion, happiness and sorrow. In ’Membering, Clarke shares his own experiences growing up in Barbados and moving to Toronto to attend university in 1955 before becoming a journalist. With vivid realism he describes Harlem of the ’60s, meeting and interviewing Malcolm X and writers Chinua Achebe and LeRoi Jones. Clarke went on to become a pioneering instructor of Afro-American Literature at Yale University and inspired a new generation of Afro-American writers.

Clarke has been called Canada’s first multicultural writer. Here he eschews a traditional chronological order of events and takes the reader on a lyrical tour of his extraordinary life, interspersed with thought-provoking meditations on politics and race. Telling things as he ’members them. (From Dundurn Press website).

Read the reviews at Quill and Quire, and The Globe and Mail.

  • Purchase your own copy, or check out the ESA Library copy out on the Black History Month display on the upper level of the Library.