World AIDS Day

Tomorrow, December 1st, is World AIDS Day.  That means that today is Candies and Condoms Day at ESA

  • Come by the Foyer at lunchtime to get your Candies and Condoms bag
  • Each bag includes condoms, candies and important information to help keep you safe
  • Talk to us about accessing Toronto Public Health Sexual Health clinics, learn how to use and care for condoms safely, learn about HIV and AIDS, and get informed about issues of consent
  • Suggested donation of $2 per bag
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For Joshua by Richard Wagamese

 Celebrated Ojibway author Richard Wagamese shares the traditions and teachings of his people, entwining them with an account of his own life-long struggle for self-knowledge and self-respect.

Richard Wagamese stares the modern world in the eye and takes careful note of its snares and perils. He sees people coveting without knowing why, people looking for roots without understanding what might constitute rootedness, people looking for acceptance without offering reciprocal respect, and people longing for love without knowing how to offer it. And underneath all lurks the seductive oblivion of substance abuse. These are the pitfalls of his own life, dangers he hopes his estranged son, Joshua, will be able to navigate with the guidance afforded by this heartfelt memoir.

Richard Wagamese has no easy answers. His road to self-knowledge has been long and treacherous — and it is in part this series of trials that has furnished him if not with a complete set of answers then at least a profound understanding of the questions. Again and again Wagamese brings universal problems into astonishingly sharp focus by sharing the special wisdom of Canada’s First Nations, while reminding us that we are not so different after all.

 

White Pine 2018 Reading Club

Plan to join us at lunch next Monday, December 4th, for the official launch of our 2018 WHITE PINE reading season.

  • Additional details to follow once we’ve launched.

Drop by the Library to sign up in advance… or fill out this online form.

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The Forest of Reading® is Canada’s largest recreational reading program! This initiative of the Ontario Library Association (OLA) offers eight reading programs to encourage a love of reading in people of all ages. The Forest helps celebrate Canadian books, publishers, authors and illustrators. More than 250,000 readers participate annually from their School and/or Public Library. All Ontarians/Canadians are invited to participate via their local public library, school library, or individually.

Goals of the Forest of Reading

  • Love of reading: Create a meaningful experience for your readers and create exciting opportunities for reluctant readers to create lifelong readers.
  • A proven head start: The results are in! Children who read for fun have higher literacy scores, have more success in science and math, and are more socially and civically engaged (Reading for Joy, P4E, 2011).
  • Libraries at centre stage: With fun activities, prizes and more, the Forest of Reading puts libraries at the heart of the action!
  • Reading Canadian: Help support and celebrate Canadian books, publishers, authors and illustrators by taking advantage of the Forest’s curated, all-Canadian reading lists for all ages and levels.

 

 

 

 

Sugar Falls: A Residential School Story by David Robertson

Sugar Falls: A Residential School Story is based on the true story of Betty Ross, Elder from Cross Lake First Nation.

A school assignment to interview a residential-school survivor leads Daniel to Betsy, his friend’s grandmother, who tells him her story. Abandoned as a young child, Betsy was soon adopted into a loving family.

A few short years later, at the age of 8, everything changed. Betsy was taken away to a residential school. There she was forced to endure abuse and indignity, but Betsy recalled the words her father spoke to her at Sugar Falls — words that gave her the resilience, strength, and determination to survive.

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of Sugar Falls goes to support the bursary program for The Helen Betty Osborne Memorial Foundation.

 

 

 

After the Last River

We are delighted to welcome filmmaker Victoria Lean to the Library today to talk about her powerful documentary After the Last River.

Victoria will be leading two sessions… during each of Per 6 and 7, before and after the lunchhour.  Please refer to the attached schedule of classes.

TEACHERS: The library will be full. Please quickly take attendance and bring your classes down. NO BAGS IN THE LIBRARY. Please remain with your class in the Library to ensure excellent behaviour.

The Break by Katherena Vermette

 When Stella, a young Métis mother, looks out her window one evening and spots someone in trouble on the Break — a barren field on an isolated strip of land outside her house — she calls the police to alert them to a possible crime.

In a series of shifting narratives, people who are connected, both directly and indirectly, with the victim — police, family, and friends — tell their personal stories leading up to that fateful night. Lou, a social worker, grapples with the departure of her live-in boyfriend. Cheryl, an artist, mourns the premature death of her sister Rain. Paulina, a single mother, struggles to trust her new partner. Phoenix, a homeless teenager, is released from a youth detention centre. Officer Scott, a Métis policeman, feels caught between two worlds as he patrols the city. Through their various perspectives a larger, more comprehensive story about lives of the residents in Winnipeg’s North End is exposed.

A powerful intergenerational family saga, The Break showcases Vermette’s abundant writing talent and positions her as an exciting new voice in Canadian literature.

 

The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

Today’s spotlight title is The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew.

When his father was given a diagnosis of terminal cancer, Winnipeg broadcaster, musician and politician Wab Kinew decided to spend a year reconnecting with the accomplished but distant aboriginal man who’d raised him.
The Reason You Walk spans the year 2012, chronicling painful moments in the past and celebrating renewed hopes and dreams for the future.
Invoking hope, healing and forgiveness, The Reason You Walk is a poignant story of a towering but damaged father and his son as they embark on a journey to repair their family bond.
By turns lighthearted and solemn, Kinew gives us an inspiring vision for family and cross-cultural reconciliation, and a wider conversation about the future of aboriginal peoples.

Read the review at The Globe and Mail.