TCAF came to ESA…

With thanks to our friends from The Beguiling for making this opportunity available to us…

Two wonderful workshops with Jen Wang in the morning, and then a lunch get-together before she had to head off to the airport for her flight back to L.A.

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Win Free Books for Your Class

Win Free Books For Your Class!

  • CBC Toronto is giving away Canada Reads books!
  • If you’re a high school student in the GTA, all you need to do is put yourself in the shoes of a Canada Reads panellist for a chance to win copies of the 2018 books for you and your classmates.

How To Enter

Send a one-minute pitch about a Canadian book you think everyone should read to Metro Morning or Here & Now for a chance to win.

  • Maybe you loved one of the Canada Reads contenders, or perhaps there’s another title you prefer.
  • Tell us why in 60 seconds or less and your whole class could enjoy some brand new reads, thanks to you.

Who: High school students in the GTA

What: A chance to win copies of the Canada Reads books for you and your classmates

How: By submitting your own one-minute defence for a book of your choosing — Canada Reads style!

  • You can email a recording (audio or video) of your defence to metromorning@cbc.ca or hereandnow@cbc.ca.
  • You can also leave a recording of your defence on the Metro Morning VoxBox by calling 416-205-5807.
  • All submissions will be randomly entered for a chance to win a classroom set of Canada Reads books.

The Toronto Star Short Story Contest

From the online edition of the paper…

  • This year’s contest runs until 5 p.m. on Feb. 28.
  • The winner will receive $5,000 and a creative writing course from The Humber School for Writers.
  • The second-place winner will take home a $2,000 prize, while third place will be awarded $1,000.
  • The winner can choose a 30-week creative writing correspondence program, valued at $3,000, at Humber, or a week-long summer workshop, worth $1,000, at the college’s Lakeshore campus in Toronto.
  • Stories can be about any topic the entrant chooses, as long as it’s original, unpublished, and amounts to less than 2,500 words. Entries are limited to one per person.
  • Submissions will be judged by a panel of the Humber School for Writers and narrowed down to a short list. The three winners will then be selected from that list by city librarian Vickery Bowles, award-winning author and journalist Kamal Al-Solaylee, Toronto Star books editor Deborah Dundas, and the Star’s former theatre critic Richard Ouzounian.

FULL DETAILS available here. 

  • You must be 16 years old to enter.
  • If you’re not 16 this year, plan ahead for next year or the year after.

2017 ESA Student Poetry Contest

And the winners are:

Each of these students will receive a copy of the 2016 Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology, as well as a print edition of this year’s edition of the ESsays Creative Writing Blog, Letters Vol III.

Library Closures

Two closures of note.

Wednesday May 24th: As noted on the announcements on Tuesday morning…

  • The Library will be closed before school on Wednesday for the Staff Appreciation Brunch hosted by Music Theatre and the Show Choir parent group.
  • Thank you in advance for what we’re sure will be a most delicious feast!

Friday May 26th: The Library will be CLOSED all morning.

  • We are looking forward to our final Visiting Author session for this year.
  • We are the ‘winners’ of a free session with TDSB Writer in Residence Jael Richardson.
  • Free visits with TDSB Writers in Residence are one of the benefits of participating in the TDSB Just Read It! programme.
  • Thanks to everyone in the ESA community who submitted book recommendations to Just Read It!… It’s because of you we’re getting this morning of workshops.  Keep submitting!!

National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month. This year’s theme is ‘Time’…  Join us, every school day throughout the month of April, for a feature poem on the theme.

Our poem of the day for today is: Hall of Mirrors by American poet Ted Berrigan.

We miss something now
as we think about it
Let’s see: eat, sleep & dream, read
A good book, by Robert Stone
Be alone

Knew of it first
in New York City. Couldn’t find it
in Ann Arbor, though
I like it here
Had to go back to New York
Found it on the Upper West Side
there

I can’t live with you
But you live
here in my heart
You keep me alive and alert
aware of something missing
going on

I woke up today just in time
to introduce a poet
then to hear him read his rhymes
so unlike mine        & not bad
as I’d thought another time

no breakfast, so no feeling fine.

Then I couldn’t find the party, afterwards
then I did
then I talked with you.

Now it’s back
& a good thing for us
It’s letting us be wise, that’s why
it’s being left up in the air
You can see it, there
as you look, in your eyes

Now it’s yours & now it’s yours & mine.
We’ll have another look, another time.

Ted Berrigan.  Born in Rhode Island, Ted Berrigan is considered a major figure of the “second generation” of the New York School of poetry. His work is conversational and expansive, and he often collaborated with other New York poets such as Ron Padgett, Joe Brainard, and Anne Waldman.